What are these?

For the past few months I have noticed these red tendrils growing on the stems of the pines (casuarina equisetifolia) used as wind breaks on the fruit farms.  They do not grow on all the trees – just a few and they are just on the lower stem near the ground – especially  on the side of the tree getting watered.  I thought that they may be a type of fungus/mushroom but Mr A has suggested that they may be air roots. Once I took the photo I could see that they look more plant-like than mushroomy. Have you seen these before?  What the heck are they? Please forward this to anyone you may think will know as I am dying to find out and my internet searches are producing nothing.

Edit:  If you would like to find the answer, please read the comments on this post.  Thank you Lisa and Georg!

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6 thoughts on “What are these?

  1. Just got an answer back from my forestry contact, Georg. He says:

    “I have seen these kind of air roots on Casuarina’s before and was under the impression, that they occur, when the tree is under stress. I have checked my literature and also the long chapter in Poynton’s new book but could not find a scientific explanation. I think, that air-roots, which form when the tree is under stress, is the most likely explanation.”

    So Mr A. was right!

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  2. Willie (my husband) who is also in forestry adds:

    “Of course the Casuarina is not a real pine tree (who are from the genus Pinus) , although it is sometimes called an Australian Pine. The Casuarina does not have needles like a pine tree but have branches and leaves than have adapted (to cope with dry conditions) to look like needles.”

    Like

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